Netflix Confessional – Lost, Season One

While in Edisto, we were residing in a house with satellite television that did not provide local networks. This meant that we couldn’t watch a show called Lost, which just about sent my mother into withdrawal. I had heard her gabbing about this show before but, being someone who doesn’t really watch television, never caught an episode. Koondog just happened to have the first season on DVD in his car, and it ended up making the ride home with me. Wednesday night I opened it up and popped in the first disc.

The story is about a plane crashing on a remote Pacific island while heading from Sydney to Los Angeles, and the struggle of the survivors. It opens with a man waking up in a patch of bamboo, and staggering out to the beach where he is surrounded by other survivors wandering around in the post-crash chaos. He springs into action and runs around saving people. We immediately like Jack. In fact, the character development in this show is something I’ve missed. There isn’t a single character that I don’t like, even Sawyer. Oh, and Kate is smoking hot in bra and jeans. (This is one of the top three sexiest outfits a woman can wear, in case you’re taking notes.)

I haven’t even finished disc two, and I’m picking up on several themes. The first theme is about light and dark, black and white, good and evil. In the first episide John Locke (the only character to have a first and last name that I’ve seen so far) is explaining the game of Backgammon to Walt. He says it’s an ancient game with two sides: light and dark. I expect this theme will develop much more, and we’ll find out how ancient this struggle between light and dark really is.

The second issue is parental. Most of the main characters have issues with their parents, such as Jack’s overbearing father. All the while, Michael is working to become a good father to Walt.

But back to John Locke, who is my favorite character. Why does he have two names? Could he be named after the 17th century Western Philospher? Just listening to my mother talk about the show, I know they’re going to encounter someone named Jean-Jacques Rousseau, which is also the name of a philosopher.

I’m looking forward to finishing Season One this weekend, and it might be enough to draw me back to to watching television.

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